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Studio Nightmares Vol. 1

Daniel Jester
Chief evangelist at Creative Force

Full episode transcript

Daniel Jester:

From Creative Force, I'm Daniel Jester. And this is the E-commerce Content Creation Podcast.

Daniel Jester:

This upcoming weekend is Halloween here in the United States. And while some of our listeners won't celebrate by going door to door with their kids, asking for candy, we thought we'd put together this special episode of the E-commerce Content Creation Podcast that we call Studio Nightmares. While there aren't too many spooky stories that take place in the photo studio; there are plenty of embarrassing, funny, and otherwise, very cringe-worthy stories out there. This episode is a collection of some of these stories from friends, colleagues, and past guests of the podcast. You'll hear from Adam Queen.

Adam Queen:

We hear sirens going off in the background. Okay so, Ohio, they have all the tornadoes and all of that. And these sirens go off and you don't really worry about it anymore, you've heard them so many times.

Daniel Jester:

You'll hear from Jen Bakija.

Jen Bakija:

We bought the extra heavy duty Post-it's after that.

Daniel Jester:

Kimmy Snow.

Kimmy Snow:

I mean the loudest studios are just so echo-ey. So it's just the loudest boom you've ever heard in your life. I crack one of my nails off, it's bleeding...

Daniel Jester:

Elizabeth Seronko.

Elizabeth Seronko:

Because you're just sitting there and you're like, "Okay, I just let all of... Hannah and Abigail are just hanging out, out there. And here they are."

Daniel Jester:

And yours truly. Holes all down my right side; holes in the back pocket, holes in the front pocket, holes down by the knee. And my leg where my skin was exposed, below the knee, was just completely thrashed.

Daniel Jester:

So sit back and have a little fun at our expense. This is Studio Nightmares Vol. 1.

Daniel Jester:

Our first story comes from Adam Queen. Adam and I started together at HauteLook on the same day in 2013. Adam is originally from Ohio and started his career in photography well before the explosion of E-comm Studios around the time of the great recession. This is a story of an outdoor shoot in Ohio that we call 'Don't Sail Away'.

Adam Queen:

All right. I'm trying to think, this was probably, Jesus, how old am I? 43. I was probably 20 years old, just getting into the industry. Pretty sure I was still in college interning for my new boss at the time. And one of our main clients at the studio, tiny studio, this studio was an old church. It had six windows that all had old glass in it that we shot mostly natural light out of. And it just so happens that this one client, ScottsMiracle-Gro, we ended up shooting everything outside in the grass next to this old church.

Daniel Jester:

Makes sense, Miracle-Gro.

Adam Queen:

So... Yeah, Miracle-Gro. It was bright and sunny out. It was middle of summer, it was hot. And this was in the middle of Ohio, so we would have these random thunderstorms that would always roll in, in the afternoon.

Daniel Jester:

Those crazy weather patterns of the Ohio river valley.

Adam Queen:

And every once in a while they just pick up out of nowhere and you're like, "What is going on?" But we had one of these massive silks that we were setting up so we could create just this really nice, soft, even light.

Daniel Jester:

It's sunny.

Adam Queen:

They shoot cars with it.

Daniel Jester:

It's sunny, you kind of try to knock down that sunlight a little bit, get a little bit more control.

Adam Queen:

And so this photographer that I worked with was all a natural light photographer for the most part, and his only way of controlling light was diffusing it and then bouncing light back into the shot just to make it look a little bit edgier, so it wasn't coming directly from overhead. And we had this massive silk, it was on these two big rollers. They were probably movie set-style C-Stand with the big rollers on there. The silk was probably lifted up. I want to guess probably 12 feet in the air, enough to walk under, but not enough to really get extra light in through the sides or anything.

Daniel Jester:

And this is one of the big boys you're talking about, right, like a 12 by, or bigger?

Adam Queen:

12 foot by 12 foot, just massive. And we had a couple tables under there for prepping all these flowers and everything that was going in the background of the shoot. Probably in the middle of the shoot, we are close to wrapping and then all of a sudden these storms just start rolling in. And we hear sirens going off in the background. Okay so, Ohio, they have all the tornadoes and all of that. And these sirens go off and you don't really worry about it anymore, you've heard them so many times. It's just like, "All right, another storm's rolling through, there might be something coming."

Adam Queen:

But no, the wind picked up, and it probably gusts, 40, 50 miles an hour. And it just took this silk right out of the sky. And our client was down on the ground, fixing the grass of the turf to make it stand up a little bit more for this. I think we were on our last shot that we were doing and it just came down and crashed right past them with all these stands. And the whole thing just blew up into a hundred pieces. And-

Daniel Jester:

And nobody was hurt though, everybody was okay?

Adam Queen:

Nobody was hurt.

Daniel Jester:

But he... oh my gosh.

Adam Queen:

The whole thing was ruined. Luckily we had the shot that we needed.

Daniel Jester:

Thanks to my old friend, Adam, for sharing that story with us. Up next, past podcast, guest, Jen Bakija. You may remember Jen from episode six of the podcast. She manages the studio for Grainger. They sell many different types of industrial equipment and components. Some of which may not be familiar to the team on set and they might need some hints as to what side of the product is the front. This is 'Beware of Fans'.

Jen Bakija:

So when our studio was downstairs and we had a limited amount of space, we had staggered start times. The assistant would come in at 7:00 AM and the photographer would come in at 9:00 AM. So the assistant and the studio supervisor, they were cleaning up all the products. They put the SKU numbers and Post-it notes on every single product to make it very easy for the photographer to understand the orientation, pick up the product, lay on the set and shoot it. When the photographer came in at 9:00 AM, I don't know, maybe the coordinator was on break or something, the stylist was on break; out of habit they turn on the robot, they turn on the lights. They turn on the fan because it's hot and it's the summer. And the Post-it notes go all over the entire studio. And not just in the studio, outside of the studio, into the GTP, goods-to-person, huge conveyor system.

Daniel Jester:

What did you guys do? Did you solve that from ever happening again?

Jen Bakija:

We bought the extra heavy duty Post-it's after that.

Daniel Jester:

So the photographer then... Basically, what we're talking about here is the Post-it notes, I think, were a queue for how things are oriented. Because when you're shooting certain types of product, you may have no idea which way is up or down. But your customer's going to know, your customer's going to absolutely know what they're looking for and which way it goes.

Jen Bakija:

Actually it's even worse than that, it was the SKU number. So when we have 50 pipe fittings and they all are elbows, you have to then figure out which one is SKU 1, 2, 3, X, 4, 5, 6.

Daniel Jester:

That is a nightmare. That is absolute.... That is a show stopper. Thank you so much for sharing that. Jen.

Daniel Jester:

Jen shared that with us when we recorded her initial episode. Many thanks to Jen for being a guest and for sharing that story.

Daniel Jester:

Next up, we have Kimmy Snow. Kimmy and I have known each other for something like 18 years. And we were co-workers together at HauteLook along with Adam Queen. This story takes place when she was interviewing for her current role at Bass Pro Shops in a tale, we call, 'I Manne CAN'T'.

Kimmy Snow:

I was so excited. Flew out for my interview, had a couple days here, got all ready. Don't know why, but was extremely concerned about my nails being the same length. There're irrational things that you go into an interview and you're like, "If I..."

Daniel Jester:

You need to be super polished.

Kimmy Snow:

If a button is off, that's that, I'm not going to get the job.

Daniel Jester:

You're interviewing for a stylist supervisor role, so you need to be styled.

Kimmy Snow:

Yes, styled to the-

Daniel Jester:

Capital D, styled.

Kimmy Snow:

With a tea at the end, styledt.

Daniel Jester:

Styledt.

Kimmy Snow:

So, get there, super cold, I'm not used to any kind of coldness in my life because I'm from California.

Daniel Jester:

This is in Missouri, for our listeners.

Kimmy Snow:

This is Missouri.

Daniel Jester:

You were born and raised in Southern California like me. And this is one of your first times in a part of the country with weather.

Kimmy Snow:

Exactly. And it was February in Missouri, so could be sunshine or could be snowing. Didn't know what you were getting into. So anyways, have a big coat on, come in, get welcomed in, normal interview things. Get walked around the studio, introduced to the team, all of that. That particular day was a Friday. And as studios, we love us a good team-building activity. So, that day was a chili cook-off. Tell me about it.

Daniel Jester:

What a day to interview.

Kimmy Snow:

I know. So they're like, "Do you want to stay and eat some chili later?" And I'm like, "Yeah, of course."

Daniel Jester:

"How long can I stay?"

Kimmy Snow:

My interview was three hours. I was there for so long. Just-

Daniel Jester:

Two hours just eating chili.

Kimmy Snow:

Just trying everybody's pots of chili, giving my two cents. So, meet the team. They're like, "Okay, later we'll have some chili", whatever. Then finally they're like, "Let's do some test shots", which is pretty normal, was expecting it. What I wasn't expecting; the mannequins that they have in the studio were kind of rigged like window mannequins that have then been put on a piece of plywood with canisters underneath, so you can wheel them around. So there wasn't a ton of heavy-bottom weight. So I go to position the mannequin in place and I just basically shove this mannequin over.

Daniel Jester:

You just came in too hot.

Kimmy Snow:

Came in too hot, too excited. Shove this mannequin over. At the same time, everybody's walking in because it's chili cook-off day. So not only is it photo studio members, it's creative department; 30 people, I'll eventually be working with, if I get the job. Probably won't, because I just shattered everything.

Daniel Jester:

You just had a grudge against this mannequin, you pushed it down.

Kimmy Snow:

So it falls down completely. The back of it cracks open. The loudest... Studios are just so echo-ey. So it's just the loudest boom you've ever heard in your life. I crack one of my nails off, it's bleeding and I'm holding my... And it's like one of those moments where if you were in school and you walk into a classroom late and everybody turns and looks at you, it was that. And so everybody turns and looks at me, and I'm pretty sure I hold up my good hand that's not dripping of blood. And I just wave and I said, "I'll walk myself out. Don't worry" Full blown, recovery. The whole time, I'm just holding my finger so that nobody sees that I'm bleeding everywhere.

Daniel Jester:

It's one thing to have an equipment accident, but the minute that you're dripping fluids in the studio, you're like "This isn't going great."

Kimmy Snow:

Well, and then I still had 16 bowls of chili I had to eat.

Daniel Jester:

You had to work your way down the line still.

Kimmy Snow:

I'm like, "Can we get some extra napkins for this chili thing?" Oh my gosh. So moral of the story is, if you want to land your dream job, just go in and destroy something.

Daniel Jester:

Destroy the place.

Kimmy Snow:

Completely destroy it.

Daniel Jester:

Eat all of their food.

Kimmy Snow:

Just tear it up, and probably, maybe they'll think of you again.

Daniel Jester:

If your story doesn't involve a chili cook-off, what are we even doing? Thankfully, Kimmy got that job and is loving her time at Bass Pro. This next story from my friend Elizabeth Seronko, one thing you have to be aware of is in a photo studio, you never know what the camera is going to catch. We call this story, 'Hannah and Abigail'.

Elizabeth Seronko:

As a stylist, you're constantly maneuvering around products; whether it be a handbag, a T-shirt on the floor, whatever. And often as a female you get dressed and you don't really put a whole lot of mind behind like, "Hey, I'm going to wear this little jean top blouse", whatever. Or V-neck T-shirt. And you're really not worrying about that outfit choice until about 11:30, and you're going through pictures and you start looking at the most recent shot on the screen, and you realize that the overhead shot has totally caught your breast. And you might have even had a little bit of a nip slip. And you're only hopeful that you actually wore a decent bra that day, because you're just sitting there and you're like, "Okay, I just let all of... Hannah and Abigail are just hanging out, out there. And here they are." And it is what it is. And then you're red-faced and you look at the photographer to see if they saw what you saw, and absolutely, because it's right there. But-

Daniel Jester:

Immediate delete. Reach for that delete key.

Elizabeth Seronko:

Immediate delete.

Daniel Jester:

You get dressed in the morning and the mirror in your bathroom offers a great perspective as to what most people are going to see. But the unique nature of the photo studio is that you have this perspective of the camera too, and you don't always think about it when you're getting dressed. You're not thinking about, "I'm going to be standing under a camera facing straight down all day."

Elizabeth Seronko:

No. In fact what's even more embarrassing is like, okay, maybe you get like a little shot of a bra or whatever, but the worst is when it's all the way down to your belly button. So, there-

Daniel Jester:

All the way through.

Elizabeth Seronko:

... there is no mystery about what's going on in there. If I had a tummy tattoo, it would be totally visible.

Daniel Jester:

Your yin yang dolphins are showing.

Elizabeth Seronko:

Absolutely. And I think live view is just really unapologetically just there for you. I can remember a handful of shots where also I was working on the ground and looking. As photographers are setting up lighting, a lot of times stylists are just kind of getting the product in frame and making sure things are starting to get to where you want it to be. And as a stylist, every once in a while, you're like, "Oh, I should probably just look over, am I straight? Are all the product getting in the shot?", or whatever. And I can remember also looking over and like, "Oh my gosh, that's my butt crack." And that was enough for me to be like, "Is there a stylist body suit that I could figure out to start..."

Daniel Jester:

Start marketing.

Elizabeth Seronko:

... "wearing?" And-

Daniel Jester:

Just pockets for... The built in pin cushion, for one thing, right? A place to put cliffs. I think we might be on to something here, Elizabeth.

Elizabeth Seronko:

Seriously. There should be a uniform, a leotard stylist body suit that you can wear, that you can get in any situation. And I'm sure there're some dudes that have worn some short shorts lately and they've probably caught themselves in some compromised positions as well. I'm pretty sure that I got rid of all of my low cut jeans after that said experience. And then now all of my jeans fall just under my bosoms. So there's-

Daniel Jester:

No chance of any angles.

Elizabeth Seronko:

... there's just no chance. I wear turtleneck to work. I think I've told you before, I'm a never nude and there's a good chance that underneath those denim jeans that go up to just under my bosoms, there's another pair of jeans shorts.

Daniel Jester:

There's another pair of jeans shorts.

Elizabeth Seronko:

Just to be sure.

Daniel Jester:

Just to be sure. Amazing, Elizabeth. Elizabeth and I work together at Amazon and she is currently the senior multimedia producer for Tuft & Needle. But she's out on maternity leave taking care of her newborn twins. Congratulations to Elizabeth. And thank you for taking the time out of your leave to share that story with us.

Daniel Jester:

Last up, yours truly. I share the story of how I almost ruined our favorite break time activity by getting in way over my head. I told the story to Kimmy while we recorded her story you heard earlier. So you'll hear some of my dear friend's commentary on what I call 'Shredded'.

Daniel Jester:

So Kimmy, you and I worked together at HauteLook in 20... I started in 2013, when did you start? That same year or were you after?

Kimmy Snow:

I was same year, just six months later.

Daniel Jester:

So we worked together at HauteLook. I was a photographer and you were a stylist. And you may remember that me and at least one other photographer, and then one of the other stylists, that we all had skateboards at one point.

Kimmy Snow:

Yes, fun times.

Daniel Jester:

And we would go out. We had our... I had bought one specifically for this purpose. I think the other guys had skateboards already.

Kimmy Snow:

They saw how cool you looked, or you saw-

Daniel Jester:

No, I-

Kimmy Snow:

... you saw how cool they looked.

Daniel Jester:

I saw how cool they looked. And I was like, "That looks like fun." We had that private parking lot. So the studio at HauteLook had a private parking lot that was just for studio staff. And it was laid out in a way that we could just skateboard in a circle. And so we would skate around during our breaks to get some fresh air. That studio's in a really nice area, it's tucked up in the right Southern California foothills. And it's a nice spot. There're not a lot of other buildings around.

Kimmy Snow:

Nice little mountain view.

Daniel Jester:

Nice views and stuff. And so we would skateboard around the parking lot just to get some fresh air, get a little bit of exercise. And it was really fun. And I had bought one of these newer hybrid... It was a longboard, a cruiser style. But it wasn't super long, it was like kind of compact. It could go very fast. And I got the bright idea one day. I can't remember if it was you, it may have been you, but it might have been somebody else, was going to go running errands during lunch. And I said, "Hey, since you're running out..."

Kimmy Snow:

It was probably me.

Daniel Jester:

Was it you?

Kimmy Snow:

It was-

Daniel Jester:

It was prob-

Kimmy Snow:

I went grocery shopping on my lunch break all the time there, as one does.

Daniel Jester:

At least we had that-

Kimmy Snow:

As one does.

Daniel Jester:

Because we had that refrigerator, you'd just stock it up with your meals and eggs, and then take them home at the end of the day.

Daniel Jester:

So we had the luxury of an hour long lunch, which is not super common for a lot of studio teams anymore. It felt quite luxurious. You could go get your lunch and then come take a nap. So you were going to go run an errand and I got this bright idea to say, "Hey, drop me off." There was a small, not exactly a shopping center, but an area about a half mile down the road that had a couple of gas stations, a couple of fast food places. And so I said, "Drop me off over there and I'm just going to grab some lunch, and then I'll just skateboard back to the studio." I did not consider that coming that direction back towards where the studio is down that road was a hill. I'd be going downhill. And it's the kind of hill that in a car you don't really think twice about it.

Kimmy Snow:

You don't notice it-

Daniel Jester:

It's just a hill.

Kimmy Snow:

... right away.

Daniel Jester:

It's not the kind of hill that's insanely steep for a car. It's just a small hill. On a very fast skateboard, as soon as I crested that hill, I was already going too fast, already. I immediately realized that I was in grave danger.

Kimmy Snow:

Wait, were you still holding your bag of luck?

Daniel Jester:

I had a bag from Del Taco, and-

Kimmy Snow:

A fried [inaudible 00:20:16].

Daniel Jester:

I had a bag-

Kimmy Snow:

Per hand.

Daniel Jester:

... I had a bag from Del Taco, and I believe I had... At the time, I remember I was buying... My God, this is too specific for this podcast. But the gas station over there also had the big liter bottles of Aquafina, two for $3. And I don't remember if we didn't have non-tap water in the studio or something. But for some reason I was buying them to keep around on set and stuff.

Kimmy Snow:

And just strapping them to your back.

Daniel Jester:

I had that in one hand and I had my Del Taco bag in the other hand. And I quickly realized that I am going faster. I'm no longer in control of the skateboard. And that was right as I crested the hill, and I had probably, I don't know, 200 more feet to go down this hill. And so I realized I'm going fast and I'm like, "I can't, I'm going too fast for me to stop this. There's nothing that I can do here." I'm thinking I can bail off of the sidewalk onto the side, but it wasn't grass or anything, it was landscaped with low hedges.

Daniel Jester:

And I just pictured myself, if I jumped into these hedges, I pictured myself getting impaled by some branch or stick that I couldn't see. So I wasn't going to try to do that. And as I'm trying to work out, "What the heck am I going to do?" And for the listeners, I wasn't a very experienced longboarder. I didn't know to use my foot to slow myself down. I don't know if I was concerned about balance or whatever to drag my foot or anything. I didn't think of it in the moment. It was an emergency and I was panicking.

Kimmy Snow:

Well, and also you were just going too fast, too quick.

Daniel Jester:

It happened so quickly. And I'm like, "Holy shit, what's going on?" And I start to get those speed wobbles, that if you've ever seen a fail video online, that usually precedes someone dramatically falling on the ground. And my instinct was to hunch down. And thankfully that got me out of the speed wobble. I stopped wobbling, I stabilized. And I'm like, "Okay. I feel like I have a modicum of control." And I realized, at this point I'm halfway down the hill.

Daniel Jester:

And at the bottom of the hill, where the hill levels off and gets flat again was the entry driveway to where you could get to the studio. And we shared that driveway with the semi trucks that would come in. So it was a very big wide driveway and it was really smooth and paved with concrete. It wasn't blacktop. And I realized, "Oh my God, if I can hang on and stay in control of the skateboard, I have enough room in that driveway to make a big sweeping right turn. I won't have to turn too quickly and I can just kind of smoothly go into this driveway, which starts to go back uphill and I'll be safe. I'll be totally fine."

Daniel Jester:

And I'm thinking like, "I can do this. I'm just going to stay low. I'm going to stay in control and I'm going to do this." And just as I think that I'm out of the woods and that I'm going to be safe, I see coming into my vision... In the state of California, and I think maybe other parts of the country too, but at least in the state of California; anywhere where a sidewalk begins to intersect where there could be vehicle traffic, they install these yellow matte things that have this really aggressive texture to them. And I see that coming into my view and I think, "I can't. I'm not going to be able to roll over that with this skateboard." Those things are like-

Kimmy Snow:

It's like life-

Daniel Jester:

... like Legos on steroids.

Kimmy Snow:

It's like life-size bubble wrap that doesn't pop.

Daniel Jester:

That doesn't pop, that's exactly right. I look, and I see if the width of the wheels of the skateboard were five and a half inches, I have maybe a six inch window of smooth concrete that I have to get through. I literally am going probably 16 or 17 miles an hour on the skateboard and have to thread this needle. So I'm like, "I'm there. I'm not going to give up now." I'm like, "I'm almost to safety." And I aim for that little opening, my front two wheels clear, I'm good. The back wheel clips one of the little bumps, the skateboard flies out from underneath me. I slam down on the pavement and I slide, on my right side, I slide, probably 18 feet. The videos of the longboarders coming down the hill.

Kimmy Snow:

It was a [inaudible 00:24:28] dream.

Daniel Jester:

And it was purely skin and clothing on concrete. I had no protective equipment whatsoever. None at all. I stand up and my adrenaline's pumping. So I'm unaware if I'm even injured or anything. The skateboard had flown across the street, so I had to run across the street. My water bottle had flown somewhere else. I'm collecting all of my stuff. I'm like, definitely there's people in the studio who are having lunch, looking out the window and saw this happen, just saw me completely eat on the skateboard.

Daniel Jester:

So I come up inside and sure enough, one of the stylists was like, "Oh my God, are you okay?" And I was like, "I think I'm okay." And I looked down, and my shorts... I was wearing, not jean cut off, but some twill pants that I had cut into shorts.

Kimmy Snow:

Some shants.

Daniel Jester:

And shants. Holes all down my right side. Holes in the back pocket, holes in the front pocket, holes down by the knee. And my leg, where my skin was exposed below the knee, was just completely thrashed.

Kimmy Snow:

Just shredded.

Daniel Jester:

Just at this point, it's dripping blood, shredded. I go into the bathroom and I find the weak little six inch by six inch first aid kit or whatever that we had mounted in the bathroom. And I just had to use everything in that kit to stop myself from bleeding.

Kimmy Snow:

And end up taping the plastic kit to your leg. Anything-

Daniel Jester:

Just wrapped in those paper towels. I'm double pulling those paper towels out of the little dispenser. One is... Automatic towel feeder. And I'm wrapping my leg. And it occurs to me, I'm like, "Oh my God, if the studio manager sees me in this condition, he's not going to allow us to have skateboards for our break time, fresh air at all. And I'm like, I have to hide this from him, because I don't want to be the guy that ruins our break time skateboards because I had to get cute and go get my lunch from Del Taco-

Kimmy Snow:

Overachiever.

Daniel Jester:

... on a skateboard. So for the whole rest of the day... And now the pain has set in. I had to rip open three of those little packets of Tylenol from the first aid kit. And I'm dumping it into my mouth. And for the rest of the afternoon, I'm working on set. And anytime the studio manager came out and would come and check in and chat with us, I had a piece of foam core that I just casually would hold down by my side and completely hide the fact that-

Kimmy Snow:

No one will ever know.

Daniel Jester:

... I had ripped my leg to shreds.

Kimmy Snow:

No one will ever know.

Daniel Jester:

No one... How are they going to know?

Kimmy Snow:

How are they going to know?

Daniel Jester:

And it worked. I got out of it that day.

Kimmy Snow:

Until you bled through the foam core.

Daniel Jester:

Until I bled through the foam core. I bled through the bandages quite quickly and it was a problem. And that was one of the first times, also... I was, how old was I at the time? Maybe 27 or something, that was one of the first times that I was like, "Oh, when you get a little bit older in life, you don't just bounce back from injuries like this. That shit hurts for several days." I had a hard time getting out of bed for a week following that because I couldn't put the weight on that leg very much. So, that's my studio nightmare. [inaudible 00:27:33].

Kimmy Snow:

Total train wreck.

Daniel Jester:

Just an absolute disaster.

Daniel Jester:

Well, that's it for this episode of the E-commerce Content Creation Podcast. I hope you enjoyed that little change of pace. If you have a funny, embarrassing or otherwise cringe-worthy story from your studio or photo shoot, send us an email at podcast@creativeforce.io. We may ask you to record your story for volume two in the future. Many thanks to all of our storytellers and thanks to you for listening. The show is produced by Creative Force, edited by Calvin Lanz. Special thanks to Sean O’Meara. I'm your host, Daniel Jester. Until next time my friends.

About the host

Daniel Jester
Chief evangelist at Creative Force

Daniel Jester is an experienced creative production professional who has managed production teams, built and launched new studios, and produced large-scale projects. He's currently the Chief Evangelist at Creative Force but has a breadth of experience in a variety of studio environments - working in-house at brands like Amazon, Nordstrom, and Farfetch as well as commercial studios like CONVYR. Creative-minded, while able to effectively plan for and manage a complex project, he bridges the gap between spreadsheets and creative talent.