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Networking for Creative Production with Kaylah Key of The Producers Agent

Daniel Jester
Chief evangelist at Creative Force

Full episode transcript

Daniel Jester:
From Creative Force, my name is Daniel Jester, and this is the E-Commerce Content Creation podcast. On the show today we talk to Dallas, Texas Space Producer and founder of The Producers Agent, Kaylah Key. If you recognize her name, it might be because you're part of her extensive network on LinkedIn. We invited Kaylah on the show to talk to us about her philosophy on networking in the creative production industry in an age when social media has possibly made us less social and more transactional.

Kaylah Key:
You want it to be a networking connection. You want it to be work-related so that you can eventually get work. But at the same time, that person does not want to be contacted by a used car salesman.

Daniel Jester:
We also discussed her company, The Producers Agent, and some of the reasons that you should consider hiring a local producer for your next on-location production. Before we begin, I'd like to ask that if you're enjoying this podcast, please consider leaving a five-star rating or writing a review. This helps us spread the word about the show and get it in front of others who may enjoy it also. We also want you the listener to become part of the conversation. So stick around to the end of the episode to find out how to get connected.

Daniel Jester:
This is the E-Commerce Content Creation podcast. My guest on the show today, I'm your host Daniel Jester by the way, in case you didn't know. My guest today on the show is Kaylah Key. Kaylah is a Dallas-based photo producer and founder and owner of The Producers Agent, which we'll touch on a little bit later in the episode. Kaylah, how are you doing today?

Kaylah Key:
Doing great. And the weather's starting to get a little bit warmer. So, that's definitely my time of year.

Daniel Jester:
I brought you on the show to talk about a couple of things specifically that I think are really interesting about you and your part of the industry, but I want to give our listeners a little bit of context about who you are. So if we're on a job interview, give me the couple of minute rundown of your background and where you are today.

Kaylah Key:
I got started here, oh my goodness, I was almost 20 years old. So definitely I had dropped out of college. I was in Kansas, so wanted to move home, and my mom had a coworker that needed an assistant, just somebody to run and make copies, pin papers up to a wall for meetings and so forth. So she kind of took me under her wing. I had no idea what on earth I was getting into, and just kind of started dropping in line art from the photo shoots and whatnot into the layouts to get approval. Just kind of fell in love with that side of the industry. And then I got married and left the country for about a year. When we returned there was a photo studio owner that we had worked with that wanted to me back at the studio. So instead of going back on a turnkey client side of things, I was now down at a photo studio and just started filling in as a studio manager, kind of learning the ins and outs of the photo studio. Had never worked in one before, so I didn't have any idea about it.

Kaylah Key:
I eventually became the producer for the still set, for the off figure set. We used to run a lot of fashion clients, and so started learning that just basic ins and outs of booking crews and kind of scheduling how many shots we could get done in a day, depending on the difficulty and so forth and just cataloging. learning that side of things. So our in-house producer actually left and went freelance and the owner kind of looked at me and was like, "Okay, you're up." And I'm like, "I don't do this. I don't want to talk to people on a regular basis." I didn't feel like I was a people person, so to speak and-

Daniel Jester:
That's why we invited you on the show.

Kaylah Key:
Yes. And so I just, I didn't feel comfortable with that. But I mean, about two months in it was kind of one of those, I started getting the hang of it. People kind of helped me and explained things to me, how things worked. And I just kind of learned from there, I really blossomed, I kind of took hold of that role as a producer, and my type A personality just flourished. And so I started running the sets, from studio shoots to location shoots, on-figure, off-figure.

Kaylah Key:
So I started really kind of pulling in my network and building those relationships with stylist, hair and makeup, other photo assistants, other producers within the Dallas area. So over time that just kept going, well then I think 2000 maybe 15, that client ended up pulling a lot of their work back in-house, just budget crunching, saving on costs and so forth.

Daniel Jester:
It was a trend across the industry for sure.

Kaylah Key:
It was, and so then the studio dissipated, then I went out full-time freelancing, gave it a shot.

Daniel Jester:
Scary.

Kaylah Key:
It was petrifying. And at the time I've got three kids, so not having a full-time paycheck is a little scary for sure.

Daniel Jester:
Right, yeah.

Kaylah Key:
So we just got going through, I started booking jobs again, I'd been in the industry here in Dallas for many, many years. I had the relationships built up. So I started booking work pretty quickly fortunately. That's when I also started getting the courage to cold call people in the industry and just start meeting people I have never met before. Dallas is a larger town, yes. But the creative industry is fairly small and big at the same time.

Daniel Jester:
Right.

Kaylah Key:
So it's like, I thought I knew a ton of people, I did not. And I'm still meeting a ton of people even now.

Daniel Jester:
Yeah. So a little like episode cross-promotion here, we recently recorded an episode with Linda Wallace who for a long time was with Nordstrom in Seattle. And it was all about managing relationships. And I think of your perspective on this, Kaylah as being a flip side of that coin sort of, where with Linda we were talking more about managing relationships within your teams when things are difficult. The other side of sort of managing relationships is around networking and building new relationships and finding people who can add value to your team. And I think you and I are probably similar in the sense that we don't just want to find the best of the best in terms of their skill or where they live in the industry, but also people who sort of align with the way that we think that we like working with. Because the relationships between team members on set are the lubrication that make all of this work. Teams that work really well together produce great images and they do it quickly, and they're inspired. And they're curious, and they're creative.

Daniel Jester:
Teams that don't get along as well, things can devolve quite rapidly. So I anticipate that there will be a lot of people who listen to this in my network who know who you are because of your presence on LinkedIn. And I think we all sort of have observed your, I guess, rise to prominence on LinkedIn as somebody who networks really well and knows a lot of people and we constantly see you out there. You know, I personally see you all the time on LinkedIn promoting job posts and trying to make those connections for people. What have you learned about how to just really effectively network? I mean, more than just getting to know people, but figuring out how to draw these connections and the ways that you're thinking about relationships that could work. Connecting two dots in a way that's more than just saying, "This person has a need and this person can fill that need, but these personalities mesh too." Share a little bit about what you've learned in your networking adventures?

Kaylah Key:
Yeah, it's funny. I actually just had a conversation about this with a photographer up in Nashville. I've been kind of doing some side work with her, really partnering with her on estimating and so forth and just kind of helping her bid jobs. So again, just another side note that a producer could help with.

Daniel Jester:
Great point, that's yeah, very cool.

Kaylah Key:
So one of the things, like she was like, "How can I build these relations?" She actually asked me the same thing, "How can I build these relationships? You seem so confident about it." And I'm like, "First off, I am petrified. Anytime that I schedule a Zoom call with somebody or ask somebody to meet, absolutely petrified. The second thing is," I told her, "don't talk about work. You're making that connection to be a networking connection. You want it to be work-related so that you can eventually get work. But at the same time, that person does not want to be contacted by a used car salesman."

Daniel Jester:
Sure.

Kaylah Key:
So essentially my advice to her was like, "Reach out to these people, make a comment on a post and say, 'Hey, I really liked your perspective on that. Can you help me with something?'" And establish a relationship, not in work terms. So that way you're building a personal relationship. So you do learn their personality, you do learn how they work. And then that's when the connections as far as, if it's job or I'm looking for crew I'm like, "This person would actually mesh really well with this photographer," so forth. You're learning the person as a person, not necessarily on skillset, because again, skillset is something that if that person is a hustler, if that person is attentive, if that person wants to learn and has the drive, I personally prefer that person over somebody with an ego, somebody with entitlement and so forth. So-

Daniel Jester:
For sure.

Kaylah Key:
That's where those personal-

Daniel Jester:
Yeah, every time.

Kaylah Key:
... relationships kind of come into play and give you that insight to who that person is, to where you can make those connections later down the road. It may be two weeks from now. It may be a year from now, but you can still make that connection.

Daniel Jester:
Yeah, I'm glad that you said that, because this is something that has been a philosophy of mine as I've recruited for studios. I want to get very experienced econ photographers into studios that I manage, but I also really enjoy bringing people up into the world who have an interest in it. And yeah, absolutely, I will look for somebody who I know has the ability within them. It's just that they may be missing the experience.

Kaylah Key:
Sure.

Daniel Jester:
And I can definitely, like you're saying, I can take somebody that has the right attitude and I can teach them all the ins and outs of taking a good picture of something. That is a learnable skill that literally anybody can learn, there's no magic or secret to it. It's just the more you practice, the better you get at it. Some of us get there faster than others, but anyone can get there.

Daniel Jester:
Obviously the pandemic made networking in some ways a little bit more difficult, but I definitely see a lot of momentum in your LinkedIn network and sort of your social spheres. And I think a lot of these lessons are true of in-person meetups or online is that you just want to be interacting in a really sincere way. Can you tell me a little bit about your growth on LinkedIn, and at this point, do you have a strategy around how you interact with people or how much time you spend cultivating those relationships online? Do you dedicate an hour of your day to just being on LinkedIn and networking, or how do you do it?

Kaylah Key:
I will say that the keyboard gives me a little bit more confidence, sitting behind the keyboard as it does a lot of people, whether that can be used for positive or negative into the spectrum.

Daniel Jester:
Yeah, right.

Kaylah Key:
When our studio closed back in, what was that, 2018, I think, my husband booked me a flight to New York and put me in a class with Gary Vaynerchuk-

Daniel Jester:
Oh, dropping a ride in there.

Kaylah Key:
And I mean, I'm the most like, "We don't need that. That's too much money for an airfare. I just lost my full-time job. We don't need it." I will say that the information that I got out of that one day class and then some networking events around that scenario for those couple of days that I was there, probably some of the most influential advice and experience that I've taken into my freelance career and has made the most impact.

Kaylah Key:
Part of that is he post almost regularly on his social media sites, as far as get onto LinkedIn every single day. And I know the algorithms and so forth, they change and whatnot, but it's like, you can always tell when I'm super busy at work, because I will kind of be a little radio silent and so forth for a week or so, but it's like, I will go on and I'll go onto my feed and just comment, comment, and make it a thoughtful comment about how is that person doing, or some type of interaction to what that person posted. People are watching. And when people go to your LinkedIn profile, they're going to go to your activity, that little bracket in there on your profile that has activity, they're going to see, are you active on LinkedIn? Are you actively putting information out there for people to see? Or how knowledgeable are you acting? Are you just liking everything or are you actually commenting on things? And what thoughts are you putting out into the universe?

Daniel Jester:
And the bottom line here is that yes, you are doing this with the goal of building a network on LinkedIn. That's a goal, it's we don't need to be shy about that.

Kaylah Key:
Sure, a 100%. I think that's everybody's goal.

Daniel Jester:
But the perspective that you're entering into it with is that, "I want to sincerely interact with these people." You're not just looking for posts to comment on because you need to comment on some posts. You're looking for like, "Where can I add value to this conversation? Where can I make a connection?" Or I like to use my comments on LinkedIn to just celebrate people's wins in a sincere way. It's not about, again, the physical act of that comment is not about doing anything other than celebrating that situation.

Kaylah Key:
Sure.

Daniel Jester:
But the benefit is that you become visible to a broader network and can make more of these connections and add more value. And I think it all needs to boil down to the level of sincerity in these interactions, right?

Kaylah Key:
Anybody that is commenting on that same post nine times out of 10 is going to click see more comments, and is going to start scrolling. And it's like, if there's a bunch of good job, good job, good job, great, whatever, this post looks good, something like that. And then you have something that's a sentence or two sentences, something that elaborates more, something that's a little bit more thoughtful. That third party, or even the original poster is going to say, "Who is this? I don't know this person, but let's click on that profile." So it opens up opportunities. If you spend my 11:30 midnight, when I should be sleeping, scrolling on my phone, it makes it worth that time. It makes it worth that 10 minutes that you were able to pop on before, while you were pumping gas or whatever the case may be. It's an invaluable part of having to network now, especially with things being so distant or not being as in-person social as they used to.

Daniel Jester:
Your efforts in networking and all of the rapid fire changes that have happened over the last year between the pandemic, and there was a lot of other things going on in e-commerce even leading up to that. You identified an opportunity to help support the industry through the founding of your business, The Producers Agents. First off, tell us a little bit about The Producers Agent. We can talk about it specifically with The Producers Agent or take a step back and say like, "There's a lot of great reasons that an organization should bring on a freelance producer, even if they have people on their staff who might kind of fit that role." I want to get into that, but first tell us about The Producers Agent and let's dive into what you've learned and how you think this adds value to the industry?

Kaylah Key:
Sure. Yes, this was another result of the pandemic. I started learning that I did have a following on social networks, whether it's Instagram or LinkedIn, anything that was business related, started gaining my confidence and my following. And my husband was like, "Why don't you start repping other producers?" There's a lot of people in our industry that are not tech savvy, when it comes to computers or how social works or postings or knowing the algorithms and so forth. Fortunately, I have a husband that is in software and kind of understands that a little bit more on a deeper level. I still don't, but I follow what he advises me to do. And so that's where it was like, "If I can help other people get work, if I can support other people. And if I get booked on a job and I need somebody else that I have a relationship with, I know can handle the workload and so forth of this client, I would want to recommend somebody that I know the client's going to be happy with."

Kaylah Key:
Again, going back to your personality meshes well, their work ethic, and their capacity to take on the workload. I don't want to put a producer out there that is going to get frazzled and anxious the second, one fire gets started and so forth, because that's the other part of producers, we put out fires left and right and the client or photographer doesn't know about half of them.

Daniel Jester:
We need to stop hiring people who's running around setting fires, I think is the key for all these productions.

Kaylah Key:
Yeah, I'm not going to lie I really don't-

Daniel Jester:
Just kidding.

Kaylah Key:
I don't think that is going to work.

Daniel Jester:
Yeah. Somehow I don't think that's going to work. Yeah.

Kaylah Key:
Yeah. Growing up. I never knew. I mean, first off, whoever thought I was going to be part of a photo studio or creative industry, not I. I went to school-

Daniel Jester:
Tell us all this time.

Kaylah Key:
I thought I was going to be a marketer. You know, a sports agent. That was my go-to. I guess in full circle I am an agent of sorts.

Daniel Jester:
That's a whole other podcast episode, Kaylah around, how many of us came in through the back door? It's such a common thread for people. I've interviewed people for this podcast who say that they came into creative production through the side entrance. And it's like, I think there's a ton of stories like that. But anyway, back to this one.

Kaylah Key:
That's another avenue that I, or platform that I want TPA to be is a learning platform. Something that college kids that don't ... They know the photo side, they know cameras and whatnot, but what about all the people behind the camera? Yes, a fashion stylist and so forth, like fashion merchandising at school, they teach, they don't understand reality, a fashion stylist on a photo-shoot. It is not bliss and glamor. It is not pretty. It is not the high end New York fashion shoot that everybody sees on TV. It's down and dirty nitty-gritty and that's where I think the worst ethic, the positive outlook and mindset and so forth. You have to have all of that kind of wrapped into a package. Otherwise you're burnt out and you're going to be out of the industry very quickly.

Daniel Jester:
A producer really needs to develop that skill of being able to interact with a lot of different personality types. And in some cases, difficult personalities, because you could have the absolute best team on your shoot. That doesn't mean that some road construction guy who's doing work on your location on the day that you happen to be there and didn't know what was going on isn't going to be mad that you're there. Or there's a million things that could come up again. Again, this is another kind of digression, but it's a great point that networking flexes that muscle on learning how to communicate effectively with different personality types, which is a crucial producer's role.

Kaylah Key:
Well, and just using an example, you can have a creative director or director on set. And I mean, just their mentality and their personality is just harsh, and as a producer you don't take things personal. You can not take things personal. But at the end of that job, when everything is done, everything's completed, nobody can be like, "Oh my God, that was terrible." Anything like that. It was a successful shoot. There is a high probability that you're going to be the one that they call back, because no matter what happened during that shoot, no matter what chaos, you kept your cool, you kept your calm and things ended up being a success. You're kind of the glue on a photo shoot, production, whatever sort. I mean video, we can go run the gamut on that, but-

Daniel Jester:
Yeah, whatever the production is.

Kaylah Key:
But as long as you have the personality and the mentality of it's not personal, this is just kind of this person's way of communicating and just do your best and make it work. I mean, people see that side of you and understand you can handle it, you can handle the pressure and you can correct it and you can fix it.

Daniel Jester:
So The Producers Agent is doing a couple of things for their current and future clients, which is that the one side that I love is I love the idea of it being a learning thing, because yes, there are roles in production. You've heard the story of the person who's like, really loves this world, but doesn't feel like they have the skill of the creativity to do this role or that. And it's like, we need people who are good at administrative work. We need people who are good at just fostering relationships and communication. Those people all have a place in a studio or in a production. So I love that. The other side of it though is that your clients, TPA's clients can benefit from your years of experience being a producer and knowing how to identify the right person for a team. And so you're taking on a lot of the vetting part of the process to say, "If I'm repping them it's because I think that they will do a good job for the right client."

Kaylah Key:
100% yeah.

Daniel Jester:
And there's a ton of benefits obviously in an organization reaching out to TPA to say like, "We need somebody." The really unique perspective is that we, you and I have discussed in the past how we think that post-pandemic how things might change. And one of the things that could come up is that travel becomes more restricted here and there as there's flare ups in different parts of the country. Things are looking better now in spring of 2021, but you never know. And so there could be a reason that an organization needs to hire a predominantly local team. So walk me through some of the benefits of, let's say an organization coming from the Pacific Northwest, who's going to do a shoot in or around Dallas where you've got a couple of different producers. What do you see are the benefits for an organization to come to TPA and say, "I need a local producer who can build out a local crew, who do you know?"

Kaylah Key:
Your local producers, the ones that are typically used to booking your location, scouting your talent, getting your permits through the local resources and so forth, those are going to be the ones that can do it the most efficient. So I can fly up to the Northwest and I can figure out who I'm going to book location wise, what talent I'm going to use and so forth. It just may take me twice as long because that's not my local market. I'm not comfortable. I don't know these people. Sure, I could look on social media and be like, "Okay, that's a photographer there. I like his work, let's go." I don't know who he is. I don't know what he's like, or she. And so that's where I think having a local producer that can book the local talent, book the local crews, comes in handy is because A, we don't have to do the travel expenses.

Kaylah Key:
You know, maybe the photographer flies out and maybe the creative director, or from the client side. But now you're just looking at two travel expenses versus an entire crew. And so then you're looking at a high caliber local team that knows the space, knows the metroplex and whatnot, wherever you are, and can give advice as well on other things. We can give advice on crew. We can give options. We know personalities a little bit more on a personal level that once we've spoken with the photographer or the client, like we can get their vibe and match them with somebody that meshes well with them.

Daniel Jester:
A great example of this that's just kind of popping into my head is that a brand may have a photographer that they have a relationship with, or in general they have somebody that they want to use, that's fine.

Kaylah Key:
Sure.

Daniel Jester:
They may not want to spend the money though to fly out a digitech, right? So they want to hire somebody local and the photographer and the digitech, they have to get along really well because if there's issues there, that's going to grind that production to a halt. And so a really key thing of hiring a local producer to help build out the rest of your team and amongst the million other things that they can do is to say, "I have a 20 year veteran digitech who's worked with everybody across the board. They know how to manage those relationships."

Daniel Jester:
And so the unknown being the photographer, because they're not in your sphere. You can match them. You can say, "Who's my most well-rounded person that I do know that I can really ensure that this goes smoothly?"

Kaylah Key:
Sure.

Daniel Jester:
Not an insignificant part of a producer's job is just, again, so much of this is just managing relationships and knowing personalities and being able to connect the right dots. As we're getting to wrap up here, Kaylah, I kind of want to get you two final thoughts, two final pieces of advice, one being on the networking side, what's your one piece of advice you would share with people who want to be more effective at networking? And then the second piece of advice from you that I'd love to get is, convince the brand that feels like a producer maybe isn't an expense that they need to take on that. They've got a coordinator on staff or somebody who can do this. Give me your two minute quick pitch on like, "You need a producer and here's why." But let's start with a networking one first.

Kaylah Key:
Sure. So the networking, just do it. Just try it, give it a shot. You are going to screw up. It is going to be awkward, but you don't know unless you try it. It's kind of, I feel like that's a saying that could be applied to any aspect of life. You can't excel at something if you don't try it. And so try the cold emails, try commenting on a post, try just reaching out and say, "Hey, I really love your perspective on these things. Would you have 30 minutes just to chat? I just want to." And kind of go that route of, "I would just like to know you more as a person. I really like the things that you're posting about." So that would be the biggest thing on networking is just try it, try different things, try different avenues, but try it.

Kaylah Key:
As far as a producer on set, it's really funny that you ask about that because I literally just had a client this week. They had hired me to be their on-set production. I booked their crews and whatnot, but that was about it. I booked their crew and then I was on set for two days. They were having their creative director actually do the scheduling because they were using in-house employees as their talent. And after speaking with the photographer and so forth, a creative director can't spend time thinking creatively, putting together mood boards, putting together talent specs and so forth if they're worried about the logistics. Like, "What's our call time? How much time for load-in and load-out? When should we do lunch? Who's catering?" Like those things. So I understand the need for that a lot of companies are using in-house employees right now to save on budget, I totally understand that, but it's kind of as a producer, email me those contacts. Let me ask them what their preferred time is, what their schedule availability is. And let me puzzle piece it together, because my brain can work out.

Kaylah Key:
Because I felt like there were some inefficiencies on set over these past couple of days that could have been a day and a half shoot, as opposed to a two day shoot or something like that. To where somebody that thinks logistically about schedules and knows how much time a shot should and could take, it's easier for them to put together something that's efficient, something that is going to give you the best product. You're not going to be rushed, but also you're not going to be sitting for an hour because you thought it was going to take three hours for a shot. Instead, it only took an hour and a half.

Daniel Jester:
Great, yeah.

Kaylah Key:
That's where I think producers really come into play is more so efficiency and cost effectiveness is where we can really benefit.

Daniel Jester:
It's one of those areas where yes, it may cost more, but there's quality of life considerations. You made a great point about the creative director who has other tasks. And then you're bogging them down with load-in and load-out times and scheduling and those kinds of things, which can be really frustrating. All of that I think really great advice, Kaylah, and very convincing. One thing I want to hog to our audience really quick that you kind of touched on that I think is really cool is like, we'll share if it's okay with you, Kaylah, some ways to get in touch with you.

Daniel Jester:
But I love the idea that you're consulting with photographers on how to bid jobs, because I know this is an area where there's a lot of anxiety amongst earlier career people is like, "I don't want to undersell myself. I want to land the job, but I want it to be fair." I love that you offer that. I think that's super duper cool. So, how can our listeners reach out to you? We can definitely link to your LinkedIn profile in the show notes. Where did they find you and where do they find The Producers Agent?

Kaylah Key:
The Producers Agent is just that, theproducersagent.com, there is an Instagram page to where it's a little bit more behind the scenes on who we represent and whatnot, and kind of them on set. With producers I mean, I try and really show them onset and behind the scenes as opposed to a portfolio, because I think that's where we shine is scheduling and budgeting and so forth and kind of number crunching as opposed to the photographers, the one that shot the image that didn't do anything for us. And then kaylahkey.com is for Kaylah Key Productions and then Instagram and LinkedIn. I mean, I try and be all over the place, but.

Daniel Jester:
And Kaylah is, K-A-Y-L-A-H.

Kaylah Key:
Yes.

Daniel Jester:
K-E-Y.

Kaylah Key:
Correct.

Daniel Jester:
Yeah.

Kaylah Key:
Yes.

Daniel Jester:
The last time I did this, I spelled it wrong and you pointed that out to me.

Kaylah Key:
My mom got real fancy and through the H in at the end, so just to throw everybody off.

Daniel Jester:
Well, Kaylah, I really appreciate your time and your expertise. And I found that conversation just quite insightful. And I loved some of your perspective, particularly on one of the sort of sometimes unsung heroes of the production world is the producer who takes on a lot of the responsibility for a studio or a shoot functioning well. And when it does go well, nobody really thinks to high five the producer a lot of the time.

Kaylah Key:
And that is true. And that's why I'm saying, "Never take anything personal because it wouldn't happen if you didn't do your job."

Daniel Jester:
Exactly, Yeah. So thank you so much for your time and your expertise, and I wish you all the best with The Producers Agent. And hopefully-

Kaylah Key:
Well, thank you.

Daniel Jester:
... some of our listeners listen to this and they reach out, because I think you add a lot of value to the conversation and I think to your production as well.

Kaylah Key:
Well, thank you.

Daniel Jester:
So thank you so much for being on the show.

Kaylah Key:
Of course, have a good one.
Daniel Jester:
You too. Thank you so much to Kaylah for sharing her time and insight in this episode. I would love to hear from you what ways you found to become more effective at networking in ways that leads to meaningful and productive relationships. You can connect with me on LinkedIn, search for Daniel Jester, you'll be able to find me. And you can also email the show at podcast@creativeforce.io. That's it for this one. The show is produced by Creative Force, edited by Calvin Lanz Sound. Special shout out to Sean O'Meara for generally being awesome. I'm your host, Daniel T Jester, until next time, friends.

About the host

Daniel Jester
Chief evangelist at Creative Force

Daniel Jester is an experienced creative production professional who has managed production teams, built and launched new studios, and produced large-scale projects. He's currently the Chief Evangelist at Creative Force but has a breadth of experience in a variety of studio environments - working in-house at brands like Amazon, Nordstrom, and Farfetch as well as commercial studios like CONVYR. Creative-minded, while able to effectively plan for and manage a complex project, he bridges the gap between spreadsheets and creative talent.